positivefeminist

I will not fight for women to be merely equal to men. I will fight for our freedom to be unconstrained expressions of ourselves..

silversarcasm:

[Gifset: Laverne Cox speaks at the GLAAD media awards, she says,

"Each and every one of us has the capacity to be an oppressor. I want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and each other."]

femmeanddangerous:

(x)

(Source: fuckyeahlavernecox, via frighteningfeminist)

houseofalexzander:

Lustrous.

A man in the grocery store line today approached me and said, “Sir, when I first saw you I was extremely attracted to you, but then I noticed that you are a boy. How… I mean, why do you dress so provocatively?”

I responded, “Well, in today’s world the majority of the straight male race view women as objects, or something that belongs to them. I dress provocatively because it attracts the attention of men in a sexual and OBJECTIVE way. However, when realized that I am actually male, they often become confused, disgusted, upset or all of the above. By inflicting this minor emotional damaged upon the ego of a man raised by twisted societal gender norms, maybe, just maybe the individual will think twice before viewing another woman with an objective attitude and sense of belonging. No woman, belongs to ANYONE. Male or female, the equality of human beings needs to be a priority. It is something worth dressing up for.”

I AM NOT KIDDING. The woman behind me, the female cashier, the old lady bagging groceries and the woman in front of me who was talking on the phone STOPPED, …. and proceeded to gasp and clap. The man shook my hand, told me to have a blessed day and then said, “excuse me ladies, I need to visit my daughter.”

…. I was shaking by the time I walked out of the store.

- Elliott Alexzander

(via justanotherparrotlover)

“Katy Perry isn’t “Woman Of The Year” because she’s made any great strides for her gender, or questioned her position in popular culture, or challenged the dominant social structures in her life. She’s “Woman Of The Year” because she’s done the exact opposite on all counts. She’s been quiet, complacent, and pretty, and she’s made her executives and managers millions of dollars in the process. She’s the version of “woman” the industry wants her to be - that is, the exact opposite of a healthy role model for young girls.”

—   Mish Way for Vice magazine (via sinaesthetica)

(Source: Vice Magazine, via womenorgnow)

biomedicalephemera:

Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar
If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.
Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.
Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.
Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

biomedicalephemera:

Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar

If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.

Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.

Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.

Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

(via howstuffworks)

furything:

alwayssmilecuzyoucan:

afangirlstreehouse:

hheath541:

Apple download - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aspire-news/id733163167?mt=8
Android download - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.collectiveray.aspire

I’m sorry - not my usual stuff - but this is incredibly important. Please share around. It could save someone’s life.

I DON’T CARE IF THIS DOESN’T SUIT YOUR BLOG TYPE IF YOU DON’T REBLOG THIS I’M JUDGING YOU 


P.S. this is the site, which also has an emergency exithttps://www.whengeorgiasmiled.org/

furything:

alwayssmilecuzyoucan:

afangirlstreehouse:

hheath541:

Apple download - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aspire-news/id733163167?mt=8

Android download - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.collectiveray.aspire

I’m sorry - not my usual stuff - but this is incredibly important. Please share around. It could save someone’s life.

I DON’T CARE IF THIS DOESN’T SUIT YOUR BLOG TYPE IF YOU DON’T REBLOG THIS I’M JUDGING YOU 

P.S. this is the site, which also has an emergency exit

https://www.whengeorgiasmiled.org/

(via the-cosmos-folly)

(Source: citymod, via thenewwomensmovement)

buzzfeed:

Everything you wanted to know about transgender people but were afraid to ask. 

(Source: BuzzFeed, via frighteningfeminist)

dounia-algeria:

hijabiswag:

friendship game strong

Amazing

dounia-algeria:

hijabiswag:

friendship game strong

Amazing

(via womenorgnow)

sorayachemaly:

Always reblog this until it is not true

sorayachemaly:

Always reblog this until it is not true

(via womenorgnow)